As Britain mourns those murdered in the terrorist atrocity in Manchester and treats the injured, antisemites have poured onto social media to blame the attack on a murderous Jewish conspiracy.

All of us at Campaign Against Antisemitism deplore the sickening attack on children and their families in Manchester last night. As the details of the attacker’s cowardice and barbarity became clear, and we heard the stories of families never to be reunited and casualties whose lives will be forever changed, we also began to see the all-too-familiar phenomenon of people rushing to social media to blame Jews.

Whilst politicians urged unity and “#WeStandTogether” trended on social media, people from around the world took to Twitter, Facebook and other platforms to claim that the suicide bombing was a plot by Jewish conspirators to fuel wars against oil-rich Muslim states, or some other variant of the depraved conspiracy myths that place Jews at the centre of the world’s every ill.

On Twitter, “Carlos” wrote: “Zionists just bombed Manchester”. “Geeky Artist Arab Woman” opined that Zionists are “the sources of all terrorism #Manchester”. “Isaac Mintman” posted his theory that “Zionists and fascists want more Islamic terror attacks in hopes of sparking civil war”. “Mama Snarf” replied to a tweet from an Israeli minister: “Most terror attacks ordered by Israel anyway. Manchester don’t need anymore Zionists”. “Dowlut Nawshad” tweeted: “The World should drive out the ‘Zionists debts theft genocide false flags monetary system$’ they ordered and responsible for Manchester.”

By Melanie Phillips

The end-game has begun. America’s nightmare presidential election has entered its final agonizing throes. The latest opinion polls suggest that Donald Trump, badly damaged by the release of the 11-year-old tape of his lewd and offensive remarks about women, is unlikely to win. His second debate with Hillary Clinton last weekend, where he put in a much stronger performance than the first, doesn’t seem to have helped him. Women are now queuing up to claim he groped them and worse, accusations he says are lies. With any other candidate, it would be game over. Yet Trump has been written off many times before.

No one can predict this election result even now. People still don’t seem to understand the enormous insurrectionist dynamic behind Trump’s rise. Those who are firmly for Trump are in wholesale revolt against precisely the kind of people who tell them they can’t insult or demean women or others who are never held responsible for their own actions.

Indeed, the near-universal hysteria over the tape was hard to credit. Surely no one can be surprised that Trump turns out to be a crude sexual barbarian? What’s more, the frenzy is being fueled by people who brushed aside Bill Clinton’s sexual excesses as a “private matter” and ignored the way Hillary used threats to silence the women he had used.

Tuvia Tenenbom has a problem. His books sell so well he can’t find a publisher in the English-speaking world. His last book, Catch the Jew!, was a spectacular international success. Published in Germany and, in English, in Israel, it shot to the top of numerous best-seller lists. His previous book, I Sleep in Hitler’s Room, was also a German best-seller. Tenenbom writes for Die Zeit. Although he was born in Bnei Brak, his fair hair nevertheless leads people to assume he is a German gentile and as such, that he harbors anti-Jewish views. Declining to disabuse people of this mistake, he goes round asking pointed questions on issues people try to avoid. The result is as devastating as it is funny.

Why are western politicians so keen to get involved with the affairs of the Jewish State? Chuck and Karen Cohen follow the latest developments.

Whatever 2017 holds for us, let’s remain focused on the ultimate goal for God’s kingdom – that He would be glorified through the exaltation of His Son. “… every tongue should confess that Messiah Yeshua is Lord – to the glory of God the Father.” (Phil. 2:11; see also John 12:27-28)

Old Testament saints knew this, and often based their prayers on it. “Help us, O God of our salvation, for the glory of Your name. Deliver us, and purge away our sins, for Your name’s sake.” (Ps. 79:9); “Not unto us, YHWH…but unto Your name give glory, for Your mercy, and truth’s sake.” (Ps. 115:1)

(A personal blog by Ian Luke Penwald)

The last of my 3 blogs from Poland and despite the angst expressed in my first two, I did in the end make the journey to Auschwitz-Birkenau. It was still pretty much a last-minute decision but as I wandered through Krakow’s impressive and beautiful Old City I found myself praying about whether or not to visit the infamous death camps. Then I turned a corner and find a small random travel agency selling tickets to the very places and so the next day…I was off.

Joshua 1:9 says, “Have I not commanded you? Be strong and courageous. Do not be frightened, and do not be dismayed, for the Lord your God is with you wherever you go.” The first question I have whenever I read this is: “Can I as a 21st century Christian Gentile, not a Jewish person and not living when it was written — not being Joshua — can I take a promise made to Joshua and apply it to myself?” My answer is yes for three reasons.

We are called to be salt and light, to live and think differently, so how come so many christians on all sides of the political divides (on both sides on the Atlantic) are succumbing to the anger and rage characteristic the spirit of this world?

Mike Bickle presents some challenging thoughts on how to live in the opposite spirit and sees the increasing turmoil as an opportunity for the church to show a different way

"There are facts, there are opinions, and there are lies," says historian Deborah Lipstadt, telling the remarkable story of her research into Holocaust deniers — and their deliberate distortion of history. Lipstadt encourages us all to go on the offensive against those who assault the truth and facts. "Truth is not relative," she says. 

(Here is a short story I wrote fourteen years ago in memory of my great-aunt Bessie. I have re-published it to give some background to the London Jewish walks I will be recommencing, starting on March 6th)

It was significant that Bessie's birthday this year fell on Passover, as her story was as much a triumph over adversity as her forbears' celebrated release from bondage. As was customary, the extended family were gathered, a pyramid of generations, with Bessie at the apex and a multitude of tiny ones, crammed at opposite ends of a table that grew healthily each year. It was also customary to invite a stranger to the seder table and this year Bessie had intrigued us with an elderly gentleman, apparently a friend from the day centre, who was sitting politely and quietly to her left, next to Sadie, my mother. I was there as family scribe. To me she had entrusted her many secrets and to me she had given the responsibility to tell them, well all bar one, anyway.

It's well known that Christianity sprang from a Jewish context. While there may be controversy about Jesus' Judaism vs. the traditional Judaism of the Sanhedrin, the ruling body of Judaism in the first century, there's no doubt that Jesus, his family, and followers were practicing Jews, as recorded in the New Testament. Biblical scholar Lawrence H. Schiffman, Judge Abraham Lieberman Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies and Director of the Global Network for Advanced Research in Jewish Studies at New York University (NYU), takes this understanding to a new level. He identifies citations in the New Testament that others have glossed over without recognizing their unique significance. On March 26-27, 2015, at a conference at NYU, "Integrating Christianity and Judaism into the Study of the Ancient World," Professor Schiffman delivered a talk titled "The New Testament as a Source for the History of the Jews and Judaism."

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