'We still haven't learned the lesson of the Battle of Cable Street 80 years on'

Willie Myers, then 14, found himself in a sea of protesters as 7,000 uniformed fascists tried to force their way through London’s East End. When Willie Myers, aged 14, went to defy Sir Oswald Mosley’s Blackshirts marching through his neighbourhood he had no idea he was about to be embroiled in a terrifying battle that would change history. He found himself in a sea of protesters as 7,000 uniformed fascists tried to force their way through London’s East End where 60,000 beleaguered Jews lived in abject poverty. The Blackshirts had a police escort of more than 10,000 officers – 4,000 on horseback – to clear the way for them. And when mounted police charged into the crowd wielding batons the Jewish schoolboy feared for his life.