RABBI NEAL SURASKY answers ...

Most scholars will agree that the Hebrew name for Jesus is the name spelled yod-shin-vav-ayin. The way it appears in English will depend on the method of transliteration. Some will write Yeshua, others will write Y'shua. These are simply attempts at writing in the English language a word that, when pronounced, will sound like you are reading it in the Hebrew. It has a specific meaning, salvation. Other names that have been suggested have different meanings. For example, Joshua, or Yehoshua, means God saves. However, none describe Him as clearly as Yeshua, which was a popular name back then.

There is no correct Hebrew name for God. He calls Himself, "Asher eh-h'yeh asher." I am that which I am. The tetragrammaton, the four-letter Name that is used in the Scripture, is yod-hey-vav-hey. It has no vowels, and therefor cannot be pronounced. Words like Jehovah are attempts to put vowels into the tetragrammaton. However, there is no "J" in Hebrew, so that cannot be a real Hebrew name.

The bottom line can be related in this way. I know my father's name. But whether I know his name or not, it is not a name that I use. I address him as dad. I don't even use it when talking to other people who know him. I say, "My father," or "my dad." And the other people do, too. "Your father." I would have gotten a swift smack on the bottom if I ever called my father, or my mother, for that matter, by their name. It is, in fact, more intimate to call them by their relational names than by their given names. It is the same thing with our Father in heaven.

There is no need to call Him by His name, even if we knew exactly how to say it. That is why in Judaism the term Adonai is used. It means Lord, or my Lord. Orthodox Judaism replaces the tetragrammaton with the word Hashem, which simply means "the name." No attempt at pronunciation would ever be made. In fact, there are those who go so far as to avoid even certain Hebrew words, for fear of getting too disresepectful. The Hebrew word eloheynu means our God. There are those who will pronounce the word as elokeynu in order to avoid any disrespect. While this degree of caution may be considered excessive, the intent behind it is nonetheless completely valid.

RABBI CRAWFORD answers ...

YHWH- Yahua
Yeshua- although some say Yahshua. I believe this to be semantics in pronunciation.

SANDRA JEFFERY answers ...

There are lots of titles of God, but His name is YHWH, or pronounced as the name ‘Yahweh’ by most Hebrew scholars. (Yahwism was the ancient name of the religion of the Hebrews). The Son of God has many titles too, but his name is Jesus, and because Jesus was born in the New Testament time period, his name would have been Greek and not Hebrew. Jesus is the Latin form of the Greek ‘I-e-sous’, which corresponds to the Hebrew name Jeshua, or in fuller form, Jehoshua, meaning “Jehovah Is Salvation”. It is pronounced by the Jews as Ye-shu’a’ or Yehoh-shu’a’ in Hebrew.

RABBI JOSEPH KRESEFSKY answers ...

One has to remember that in the Ancient Hebrew text there were no vowels; as such, when we read that G_d told Moshe His name being YHVH, no one knows the correct pronunciation of this. It can be assumed that by adding certain vowels to this, the pronunciation might be Yud Heh Vav Heh, but again no one knows for certain. This is going to be one of those that we’re going to have to wait on Him for the correct answer.

Now, as for “Jesus”, that is a little clearer - Y’shua - G_d saves. Y’shua or Yeshua, spelled ???????? or ???? in Hebrew was a common name among the Jewish people of the Second Temple Period. In modern Hebrew, Yeshua (????) is in fact the common transcriptions for Jesus.